Category: Flashes

Shooting macro images with a flash

For macro images that need a flash, you can use your Speedlite. However, because you need to get so close to the subject, sometimes the flash goes over the subject and does not illuminate it properly, or the flash overexposes the image. If you don’t happen to have one of Canon’s two flash units designed [...]

Continue Reading

Using multiple wireless speedlites

You can use the 430EX or 580EX II wirelessly to create a multilighting effect much like you would have in a professional studio lighting setup. To do so, you need to set a single flash attached to your camera as the master unit and set the receiving flash(es) as slave units. The master flash utilizes [...]

Continue Reading

Exploring canon speedlite flash capabilities

While Canon Speedlite flashes can be used in master/slave configurations where multiple units are set up in a studio-lighting manner, by far the most common way photographers use these hot-shoe mounted flashes is as a single unit atop their cameras. You may have recently upgraded to an external flash after having decided that the built-in [...]

Continue Reading

Second-curtain sync

Your camera uses mechanical devices called curtains to open and close its shutter. The default setting is for your Speedlite to fire at the beginning of the exposure, called first-curtain sync. In most cases this is just fine; however, when taking long exposures of a moving subject when using flash, the result is the subject [...]

Continue Reading

Stroboscopic (Multi) flash

Stroboscopic (Multi) flash

This special-effect feature of the 430EX and 580EX II allows you to fire a series of flashes from a single Speedlite during one exposure — for example, showing a subject moving within a single photograph (see 8-16). To use the stroboscopic function, you need to decide what kind of a photo you want to take [...]

Continue Reading

Modeling flash

Modeling flash

In a studio, modeling lights are used in combination with strobes, and are often integrated into single light units. These are lights that remain on (unlike a flashing strobe) to help you see how light is falling on a subject before firing the flash. They let you see shadows and highlights as they will appear [...]

Continue Reading

Setting your flash manually

You can manually set the 430EX and 580EX II to fire at a wide range of settings. For example, you can set output on the 580EX II anywhere from 1/128 power to 1/1 (full) power at 1/3-stop increments. If you are doing close-up photography (such as nature, food, or macro subjects), being able to set [...]

Continue Reading

Bounce flash

Bounce flash

If you’re trying to lessen the harshness of a flash shot so your images appear more natural, your flash can operate in a variety of different physical positions that allow light to literally bounce off walls or other nearby obstacles . This is a very common technique used by professional photographers, each of whom seems [...]

Continue Reading

High-speed sync

Normally, flashes are set to operate with a camera shutter speed of 1/250 second or slower. If you have a flash attached to your Canon dSLR, you will not be able to set the shutter speed on your camera to a speed faster than 1/250 second. Your camera’s shutter needs a little time to open [...]

Continue Reading

Flash exposure lock

Flash exposure lock

Sometimes you may want to lock in on a particular exposure or a specific flash setting and then change your position for the shot and still shoot with that setting. To lock in on a specific exposure, you’ll want to use your dSLR’s Exposure Lock. You can also lock in on a specific flash setting, [...]

Continue Reading

Flash exposure bracketing

Bracketing in photography means you take several shots of the same subject — typically three — where you increase and descrease the aperture by one or more stops. For example, you might shoot an f/4.5 image at f/2.8, f/4.5, and f/5.6 to be sure you have the right exposure; your dSLR will let you set [...]

Continue Reading

Flash exposure compensation

Flash exposure compensation

Sometimes the amount of flash illuminated on a subject just might not be right, no matter how smart ETTL might be; for example, when there are extreme levels of light or dark in your photo causing the flash to misinterpret and try to compensate. Or, perhaps you want to tone down the effect of the [...]

Continue Reading

Other flash equipment

Other flash equipment

Canon offers three specific flash accessories beyond its Speedlite flashes; however, a wide variety of flash accessories exists for Canon flashes beyond those offered specifically by Canon, including different products that help you bounce and diffuse flashes, and that bracket-mount the flash (a separate mechanical device on which you mount your flash and that lets [...]

Continue Reading

Built-in flash techniques

Built-in flash techniques

Many of the Canon dSLRs offer a pop-up, built-in flash as part of the camera body. The exceptions to this are the professional Mark II and III models, which do not have a built-in flash and require you to use an external flash. Of course, many studio photographers are also using model and flash lighting [...]

Continue Reading

Flash basics and more

Flash basics and more

Flashes can be your best or worst friend, depending on the situation, ambient lighting, and what you know about how your flash operates. Many photographers opt to not use a flash if it’s at all possible because natural light is softer and usually provides the best tonality and depth to an image. Yet a flash [...]

Continue Reading

How ETTL II technology works to your advantage

How ETTL II technology works to your advantage

The ability of your camera to intelligently evaluate the photo you are taking and apply flash lighting to it is the result of many years of technology advances and developments. Studio photography with multiple external strobes and lights set and controlled by the photographer, and essentially invisible/unrecognized by the camera, must be metered manually. An [...]

Continue Reading