Recent Articles

Water and moisture are your camera’s greatest enemy

Water and moisture are your camera’s greatest enemy

Most technicians agree that water is your camera’s greatest enemy. Serious water penetration can be very harmful, if not fatal, to a camera. Even a heavy rain can permanently damage a camera. While cameras will tolerate a few raindrops, you’ll need an underwater housing to survive complete immersion or a heavy splash. And even small [...]

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Salt as camera-gear enemy

Salt damages camera gear by accelerating oxidation (rust) on metal components, and salt air and saltwater also deposit a messy, oily film onto lenses and photo sensors. When you’re shooting on a beach or near saltwater, you’ll want to be ready to clean your equipment and protect it from too much exposure when changing lenses [...]

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Oils and chemicals – camera-gear enemies

The types of substances I’m discussing here are not industrial, heavy-duty chemicals, but rather what you might come into contact with on a daily basis: sunscreen, insect repellent, makeup, and body lotions. The list is nearly infinite for what can affect your camera, so I’ll deal with some of the most common and general ones [...]

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Physical damage to cameras and lenses

Physical damage to cameras and lenses

No matter how careful you are, accidents happen. When I dropped my Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8L lens while shooting in a temple in a small Chinese village, I didn’t have a lot of options for repair and I seriously needed that lens for the trip. I had been very careful when changing lenses, but it [...]

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Picture styles

Picture styles

Canon dSLRs support Picture Styles that provide a way to manage photo colors from shoot to print. When you’re using Canon cameras, software, and printers, this proprietary standard allows you to be sure that what you shoot is ultimately what will print, providing you stay with Canon equipment and applications. In your camera’s menu, you [...]

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Prioritizing and comparing photos

In Digital Photo Professional, you have several options for managing your photos and separating the best shots from the ones you don’t want or need: The checkmark system, available from the main screen, lets you mark and rank images as priority 1, 2, or 3 (or none at all). The Quick Check mode, accessed from [...]

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Managing images in Digital Photo Professional

Managing images in Digital Photo Professional

You can open an image that you would like to work on by double-clicking on it. For this example, I chose a RAW photo of an Egyptian Bedouin boy galloping a horse up a hill while holding another young horse beside him. I plan to use some basic tools involving cropping and exposure control (see [...]

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Digital Photo Professional main screen

Digital Photo Professional main screen

As an introduction to Digital Photo Professional, I’d like to take you on a brief tour of Egypt. When you launch Digital Photo Professional, the main screen opens, as shown in 9-9. There you’ll have a number of options in the form of buttons for managing the program and your images, as well as drop-down [...]

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Installation and updates digital photo professional

If you received the Canon EOS Digital Solution Disk, insert it into your computer and install the software according to instructions. Once installed, check Version Information under the Help menu (or About Digital Photo Professional under the Digital Photo Professional menu) to be sure you are running the latest version. To download updates, go to [...]

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Canon’s digital photo professional

Canon’s digital photo professional

Canon EOS digital cameras ship with Digital Photo Professional, which is an image-processing and-management utility especially optimized for RAW image processing and, of course, Canon equipment. As of this writing, the software is in version 3.4.1, has matured over the past few years, and features support for new camera models as they have become available. [...]

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Getting and keeping the highest image quality

Getting and keeping the highest image quality

A number of issues factor into getting the highest image quality, and they occur at both the pre-pixel and postpixel phases of your workflow. Some involve common sense, while others may require you to take some specific technical steps to preserve your images and present them in their best possible way. CAMERA CARE Whenever possible, [...]

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Managing and archiving photos

Managing and archiving photos

Once you’ve transferred your images safely to your digital studio, you need to process and permanently archive them before you begin any editing or fulfillment. You want to keep your images in as pristine a condition as possible — meaning that master images should not be multiple-generations old (especially true for JPEG files) or altered [...]

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Image storage and backup

Image storage and backup

Securely and quickly moving your images from a memory card to a computer takes place in different ways depending on where you are and how you like to work. For example, if you’re photographing a day-long wedding with an 8GB flash card, you may be able to shoot and store the entire event on that [...]

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Workflow: The foundation of great photography

The concept of digital photography workflow involves far more than image editing in a specific application such as Digital Photo Professional or Photoshop. Rather, it encompasses your photography from the inception of a shoot to its ultimate completion — whether as a framed print on a wall, an image on a Web site, or part [...]

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Shooting macro images with a flash

For macro images that need a flash, you can use your Speedlite. However, because you need to get so close to the subject, sometimes the flash goes over the subject and does not illuminate it properly, or the flash overexposes the image. If you don’t happen to have one of Canon’s two flash units designed [...]

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Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX

Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX

The Macro Twin Lite MT-24EX is actually two separate, swiveling flashes separated laterally from one another for increased depth and variety in lighting your close-up subject with a controller unit that attaches to your camera’s hot shoe (shown in 8-18). This unit gives you more flexibility than the ring-type light for macro photography, although the [...]

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Macro ring lite MR-14EX

Macro ring lite MR-14EX

The Macro Ring Lite MR-14EX is a specialty macro flash light that provides flash illumination for macro photography. This model is a traditional macro ring light (as shown in figure 8-17). Its ring contains two lights, but you cannot separate them from the ring configuration. The device consists of a controller unit that attaches to [...]

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Using multiple wireless speedlites

You can use the 430EX or 580EX II wirelessly to create a multilighting effect much like you would have in a professional studio lighting setup. To do so, you need to set a single flash attached to your camera as the master unit and set the receiving flash(es) as slave units. The master flash utilizes [...]

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Exploring canon speedlite flash capabilities

While Canon Speedlite flashes can be used in master/slave configurations where multiple units are set up in a studio-lighting manner, by far the most common way photographers use these hot-shoe mounted flashes is as a single unit atop their cameras. You may have recently upgraded to an external flash after having decided that the built-in [...]

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Second-curtain sync

Your camera uses mechanical devices called curtains to open and close its shutter. The default setting is for your Speedlite to fire at the beginning of the exposure, called first-curtain sync. In most cases this is just fine; however, when taking long exposures of a moving subject when using flash, the result is the subject [...]

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