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Stroboscopic (Multi) flash

Stroboscopic (Multi) flash

This special-effect feature of the 430EX and 580EX II allows you to fire a series of flashes from a single Speedlite during one exposure — for example, showing a subject moving within a single photograph (see 8-16). To use the stroboscopic function, you need to decide what kind of a photo you want to take [...]

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Modeling flash

Modeling flash

In a studio, modeling lights are used in combination with strobes, and are often integrated into single light units. These are lights that remain on (unlike a flashing strobe) to help you see how light is falling on a subject before firing the flash. They let you see shadows and highlights as they will appear [...]

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Setting your flash manually

You can manually set the 430EX and 580EX II to fire at a wide range of settings. For example, you can set output on the 580EX II anywhere from 1/128 power to 1/1 (full) power at 1/3-stop increments. If you are doing close-up photography (such as nature, food, or macro subjects), being able to set [...]

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Bounce flash

Bounce flash

If you’re trying to lessen the harshness of a flash shot so your images appear more natural, your flash can operate in a variety of different physical positions that allow light to literally bounce off walls or other nearby obstacles . This is a very common technique used by professional photographers, each of whom seems [...]

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High-speed sync

Normally, flashes are set to operate with a camera shutter speed of 1/250 second or slower. If you have a flash attached to your Canon dSLR, you will not be able to set the shutter speed on your camera to a speed faster than 1/250 second. Your camera’s shutter needs a little time to open [...]

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Flash exposure lock

Flash exposure lock

Sometimes you may want to lock in on a particular exposure or a specific flash setting and then change your position for the shot and still shoot with that setting. To lock in on a specific exposure, you’ll want to use your dSLR’s Exposure Lock. You can also lock in on a specific flash setting, [...]

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Flash exposure bracketing

Bracketing in photography means you take several shots of the same subject — typically three — where you increase and descrease the aperture by one or more stops. For example, you might shoot an f/4.5 image at f/2.8, f/4.5, and f/5.6 to be sure you have the right exposure; your dSLR will let you set [...]

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Flash exposure compensation

Flash exposure compensation

Sometimes the amount of flash illuminated on a subject just might not be right, no matter how smart ETTL might be; for example, when there are extreme levels of light or dark in your photo causing the flash to misinterpret and try to compensate. Or, perhaps you want to tone down the effect of the [...]

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Other flash equipment

Other flash equipment

Canon offers three specific flash accessories beyond its Speedlite flashes; however, a wide variety of flash accessories exists for Canon flashes beyond those offered specifically by Canon, including different products that help you bounce and diffuse flashes, and that bracket-mount the flash (a separate mechanical device on which you mount your flash and that lets [...]

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Speedlite 580EX II

Speedlite 580EX II

Canon’s latest-generation and flagship flash, the 580EX II, is a highly capable flash that can be used with any of the Canon dSLRs. However, it has been optimized to take full advantage of the EOS-1D Mark III camera’s capabilities, as well as to match the camera’s functionality and durability (other Canon flashes were somewhat of [...]

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Speedlite 430EX

Speedlite 430EX

Replacing the 420EX, Canon’s 430EX (see 8-7) is a more affordable (by about $100) flash than the 580EX II and is designed as a great companion with many of the mid-range dSLR models — most of which feature an internal flash as well. It is also smaller and lighter than the 580EX II. If you [...]

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Speedlite 270EX

Speedlite 270EX

The most affordable and lightweight Speedlite (about $100 less than the 430EX), the 270EX only operates automatically. If you are at the point where your pop-up flash just isn’t enough but you don’t need or care about having lots of technical control over an external flash, this is a great option — a very inexpensive [...]

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Built-in flash techniques

Built-in flash techniques

Many of the Canon dSLRs offer a pop-up, built-in flash as part of the camera body. The exceptions to this are the professional Mark II and III models, which do not have a built-in flash and require you to use an external flash. Of course, many studio photographers are also using model and flash lighting [...]

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Flash basics and more

Flash basics and more

Flashes can be your best or worst friend, depending on the situation, ambient lighting, and what you know about how your flash operates. Many photographers opt to not use a flash if it’s at all possible because natural light is softer and usually provides the best tonality and depth to an image. Yet a flash [...]

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How ETTL II technology works to your advantage

How ETTL II technology works to your advantage

The ability of your camera to intelligently evaluate the photo you are taking and apply flash lighting to it is the result of many years of technology advances and developments. Studio photography with multiple external strobes and lights set and controlled by the photographer, and essentially invisible/unrecognized by the camera, must be metered manually. An [...]

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Cleaning and storing lenses

Cleaning and storing lenses

It’s easy to become obsessed with keeping a clean lens, doing everything you can to keep even the smallest speck of dust off of the glass. However, while it’s of course advisable to keep lenses reasonably clean of dust and certainly devoid of oily smudges such as fingerprints, in reality a bit of dust isn’t [...]

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Using lens hoods

Using lens hoods

Many lenses ship with a hood, which is advisable to use in a number of photographic situations. A lens hood provides protection for the lens, such as from bumping into things or if the lens is dropped, and it can prevent things, such as raindrops, from getting onto your lens and affecting an image as [...]

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Filters worth considering

Filters worth considering

Lens filters — whether they’re dropped in at the back-end of a long super-telephoto lens or screw-mounted onto the front of the most common lenses — can be very useful for a variety of photographic purposes and can even save you a lot of money in the event of a lens accident. From colored filters [...]

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Protective and uv/haze filters

Basic protective filters, also known as neutral filters, offer no additional protection or filtration for your lens. They are made of pure optical glass and are widely available from various filter manufacturers such as Tiffen and B&W. Note that technically these are not actually filters because they aren’t filtering anything, but they usually are grouped [...]

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Skylight and warming filters

A skylight filter helps you moderate what can be too much blue in your image, especially on sunny days with an excessive amount of blue sky. It’s a subtle effect, providing just enough filtration to your image that the color is much better balanced; it is especially effective in a shady area under a cloudless, [...]

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