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How the lens communicates with the camera

How the lens communicates with the camera

Most modern lenses have the ability to communicate electronically with the camera. All Canon EF mount lenses contain a microprocessor within the lens providing a set of information to the camera. When you turn on an EOS camera, the camera and lens communicate. The camera knows the focal length of the lens, and if it [...]

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How lenses work

How lenses work

The lens acts as the eye of your camera, and, like the human eye, some lenses focus better than others. Some are better at seeing distances; others are better at reading fine print. Camera lenses are typically made of many individual polished glass elements. For the camera, the function is the same: to focus light [...]

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Tips for shopping for lenses

I have one steadfast piece of advice I give to all prospective lens buyers: Evaluate the lens with your intended use in mind. It’s very common in today’s online-driven economy for photographers to spend hours reading photography Web site reviews, blogs, and chat groups that extol the virtues of one particular lens and deem another [...]

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Considering the depth of field factor

Learning depth of field and how to control it is one of the single most important aspects of photography. This is what separates you from the point-and-shoot crowd, and this is what allows you to control the exposure rather than allowing the camera to do it. One of the first steps in becoming a serious [...]

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Exploring focusing options

Exploring focusing options

Today’s modern lenses offer photographers amazing optical quality, and whether you choose to focus using one of the automatic focusing modes or to focus your lens manually, you can obtain razor-sharp images with the lineup of Canon lenses. Focus can be defined as the point at which light rays from the lens converge to form [...]

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Learning the basics of lenses

Learning the basics of lenses

Camera lenses cost from less than $100 to as much as $6,000 or more. Yet they all basically do the same job: create an image on the digital sensor. As a rule, however, better-quality lenses, such as the 70-200mm f/2.8L used to take the photo shown in 3-3, are more likely to produce higher-quality results. [...]

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Building the backbone of your system

Building the backbone of your system

You should treat your camera system as you would a good-quality audio system: Purchase great speakers and work back toward the amplifier. As you upgrade other equipment, the system will continue to get better; if you start with inferior-quality speakers, the other components don’t matter as much. Consider lenses in the same manner: Concentrate on [...]

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Getting the most from your Canon dSLR

Getting the most from your Canon dSLR

At this point you may be asking yourself, “What settings should I use with my camera?” In addition to your settings for exposure and composition, your Canon dSLR image will look best when you take full advantage of your camera’s color, image size/resolution, Picture Style, and custom function settings. These can make all the difference [...]

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What difference does Frame Rate make?

The frame rate of a camera is the speed at which images can be continuously recorded and saved. Frame rate is governed by several factors, including the resolution (number of pixels), the buffer size, the speed of the image processor, and the write speed of your memory card. Obviously, higher-resolution cameras such as the 5D [...]

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Crop factor

Crop factor

If you were to put the same lens onto different camera bodies with different image sensor sizes — full-frame and smaller—you would notice that what you see through the viewfinder is a smaller physical area in the cameras with the smaller sensors, as seen in 2-9 and 2-10. The term crop factor refers to the [...]

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Exploring different image sensor sizes

In the world of digital imaging, you constantly hear or read the term “full-frame sensor.” What exactly does this mean and what are the advantages and disadvantages? A full-frame sensor is designed to capture the full size of the film frame. In the case of Canon, this is 36 X 24 mm, or the full [...]

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The Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT

The Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT

For ease of use combined with great dSLR performance, as an entry-level dSLR you need look no further than the Canon EOS Digital Rebel XT. It’s available for a remarkably low cost — in fact, less than some high-end point-and-shoots — and yet makes use of the incredible selection of Canon lenses and accessories. As [...]

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The Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTI

The Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTI

The Canon EOS Digital Rebel XTi takes the XT one step further with a great lineup of features designed and priced as a very competitive consumer dSLR. In this case, bigger is better: The sensor is bigger (10.1 megapixels) and the LCD is now 2.5 inches — both great changes that make an already easy-to-use [...]

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The Canon EOS Rebel XSI

The Canon EOS Rebel XSI

Just announced as this book was going to press, the EOS Rebel XSi does to the Digital Rebel XTi what the XTi did to the XT: It takes a great camera even one step further towards perhaps being the perfect consumer dSLR, capable of producing astounding near-professional results. With 12.2 megapixel capability, a DIGIC III [...]

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The Canon EOS 40D

The Canon EOS 40D

The Canon EOS 40D is the successor to the 30D, which was the successor to the hugely popular EOS 20D, and is without question one of the most popular dSLRs of all time. The 20D is responsible for many of the recent converts to the Canon system. The 40D features Canon’s proven 10.1.-megapixel CMOS sensor [...]

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The Canon EOS 5D

The Canon EOS 5D

The Canon EOS 5D (see 2-8) was an instant hit upon its release and it is no wonder, considering that it offers a full-frame CMOS sensor with 12.8 megapixels and currently sells for less than $3,000. It has become a fast favorite of many professional photographers, due to the high resolution and lighter weight of [...]

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The Canon EOS-1D Mark III

The Canon EOS-1D Mark III

The EOS-1D Mark III has the same body, build quality, and most of the advanced features of the EOS-1Ds Mark III with more emphasis on speed than resolution, not to suggest this camera is in any way a substandard. On the contrary, Canon’s new EOS-1D Mark III can record 10 fps for up to 110 [...]

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The Canon EOS-1DS Mark III

The Canon EOS-1DS Mark III

The big-boy leader of Canon’s dSLR lineup is the EOS-1Ds Mark III, a workhorse of a camera built to endure the rigors of the field in very rigorous and demanding applications such as outdoor assignments, but optimized for studio use with its large megapixel size and full-frame sensor. A photographer I know of uses an [...]

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Technologies and features common to canon dSLRs

Technologies and features common to canon dSLRs

Regardless of which dSLR you have or are considering, Canon has a long track record of employing consistent technologies within their dSLR lineup. Since digital photography came into its own, a defining characteristic of the progression of the industry has been the gradual addition of more and more high-end (professional) functionality to consumer models. The EOS [...]

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What resolution is right for you?

What resolution is right for you?

While most photographers focus on the number of megapixels to gauge a camera’s resolution, the actual resolution is more complex than the number of pixels on an image sensor. For example, the camera may not use all the pixels in the digital image; some pixels may be used for other imaging tasks. Other factors come [...]

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